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How to Use RPE for Cycling Training

RPE (rate of perceived exertion) is a well known quantification of exercise effort. First introduced by Gunnar Borg in 1970, RPE was determined on a 6-20 scale with 6 being ‘no effort at all’ and 20 being maximal exertion. In cycling, we have other technologies to quantify intensity. Heart rate and power meters can tell … Continue reading How to Use RPE for Cycling Training

How to Convert Kilojoules to Calories for Cycling

Kilojoules and calories are both units of energy; they quantify the amount of energy stored in an object or the amount of work (force times distance) done. While joules are normally used for scientific pursuits, calories have been adopted by the dietetics community to describe the energy stored in the foods we eat. While there … Continue reading How to Convert Kilojoules to Calories for Cycling

Dynamic Warm Up Exercises – The Definitive Guide

In the past, athletes didn’t always to do dynamic warm up exercises. Back in ‘ye olden days’ of sports science, the 1980s, some pretty smart exercise science professors had the idea to stretch prior to exercise. The idea was simple: increasing joint mobility and range of motion would decrease the likelihood of injury. One great … Continue reading Dynamic Warm Up Exercises – The Definitive Guide

Essential Items for a Training Ride

Cyclists, more than anything else, train on their bike. Some 90%+ of all rides are training rides and there’s a good reason for that. Training rides give us a chance to work on specific aspects of our cycling and hone those skills for race day. The protocol for a training ride is fairly simple: go … Continue reading Essential Items for a Training Ride

Cycling Training Zones – Train in The Right Zone

The idea of training zones was established in the cycling community largely due to the book Training and Racing with a Power Meter. It was originally published in 2006 by Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan. Training zones have since taken the cycling world by storm as an effective way to describe interval intensity and allow … Continue reading Cycling Training Zones – Train in The Right Zone

The Three Energy Systems and How They Relate to Cycling

Energy production in organisms comes from the controlled breaking of complex molecules into simpler ones. For us humans, we break ATP (adenosine triphosphate) down into ADP (adensoine diphosphate) by popping off one of the phosphate molecules. The energy produced in this process is used by our motor units to produce muscle contractions and, for cyclists, … Continue reading The Three Energy Systems and How They Relate to Cycling